iPSC Core

iPSC Core

The Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Core at the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics aims to build model systems to further understand neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. We are able to generate human stem cell lines from blood or skin fibroblasts, allowing for the generation of patient-specific stem cell lines. By creating iPSC lines from patients, it is possible to examine the impact of the specific genetic variations they carry in their DNA on disease pathology. We are able to transform the iPSCs into mature, disease specific cell types including neurons to investigate autism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease and Parkinson’s disease, cardiomyocytes to learn more about Long QT syndrome, and photoreceptor cells to research the eye disorder retinitis pigmentosa.

These models allow us to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of disease pathogenesis and, in the future, could potentially be scaled up in order to perform drug screening. We have recently been awarded grants to continue our studies on Alzheimer’ disease (Alzheimer’s Association, Department of Defense, Florida Department of Health), Parkinson’s Disease (National Institutes of Health), and Long QT syndrome (American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health). Since its inception in 2015, the HIHG iPSC Core provides high-quality and reliable iPSC derivation and validation services for both academic and industrial research communities.